Belfast to Luogh South

Story Tellers Cottage – Doolin

4th October 2019

A decent drive today – 251 miles = 404kms and it took 9 hours and we only stopped for lunch and morning tea! Its not like Australia lol.

Ireland is wonderful – in spite of the weather. No-one seems to care and just gets on with their day. It’s a little uncomfortable at times, but hey, life’s like that. Everyone has a jacket or an umbrella so there is really nothing to complain about. We are very well equipped and have not suffered much so far. My high tech pants just let water sit on them until I stamp my feet for it to get off. They dry in a very short time. Very weird but clever.

We had a weather warning to consider yesterday – Hurricane Lorenzo was heading our way, at 3pm. We were heading into the storm for a while and then went south – as planned – and avoided most of it. The roads were wet and windy but we were not staying in its predicted path so it was all ok on the day.

This is the track of Hurricane Lorenzo and we drove across the top from Belfast to Sligo then south and we are staying where that black dot is, so only a little way south and the winds have been relentless.

I slept through it, I might add, but have been up since 5:30 am and they keep blowing ferociously. This house is solid and cosy so no dramas really but it certainly is windy!

Long drive – but so much to see.

We hit the road earlyish around 9am to avoid too much of the peak-hour traffic. At the beginning of the trip we were on the M1 and made good progress through lovely green fields and good quality roads.

We did see a lot of farm animals and found those roads you hear about that are narrow and tricky to pass on. Well add rain, wind, fading light, unfamiliarity and its quite a challenge. But we were up for it!!

Dark, gloomy day but we don’t mind
Roadside flowers
The ‘green’ of Ireland we have come to see.
Stopped for a closeup of these berries which are everywhere.
The stock doesn’t seem to mind the weather.

Morning Tea in Enniskillen

There seem to be two parts to Enniskillen – one old, traditional and one more modern and commercial looking.

We found a Tesco store and fuel and bought what we needed and headed to Jenny’s Coffee House and Bakery. The best!

Sooooo yummy. Had tea for two and a scone with jam.

Onwards to Sligo and we found a lovely pub called The Harp Tavern.

There were moments of sunlight o the way.
Some beautifully maintained cottages and some not so.
Heading towards Sligo
Roads are good and windy-not straight and yes the wind was blowing too, just for clarification.

Lunch in Sligo

Lunch or Irish Stew and Mushroom soup. Yum!! Also, served by the lovely Ann who could not understand why businesses were shutting because of a “little wind”.
Interior of the Harp Tavern
Sligo, Sligo

Then we continued south,, towards County Clare, and along roads made for smaller vehicles than two of the modern sort. The roads are pretty good, albeit a few cracks, potholes and flooding. We made good time in spite of our newness to this type of driving.

Rally driving without the gravel.

The speed limit on the skinny roads was 80kms but in the rain and conditions generally neither of us got over about 60kms per hour. Safety first!!

But then you round a corner and happen upon sights that just don’t seem real.

The ruins of Kilmacduagh Monastery near Gort, County Galway

Kilmacduagh sits at the edge of the Burren, dominating the rural landscape some 5km south-west of Gort, in Co. Galway. In the medieval period, it was the most important church of the Uí Fiachrach Aidhne, a powerful local dynasty who held lands that stretched from the Atlantic coast to the mountains of the Burren and Slieve Aughty. By the twelfth century, Kilmacduagh had an enclosed settlement with the main church at the centre, at least three subsidiary churches, a round tower, the grave of the founder, Cólmán mac Duach, and a well dedicated to him. The settlement was transformed when the main church was enlarged as a cathedral and a monastery for Augustinian canons was established in the thirteenth century. http://monastic.ie/history/kilmacduagh/

Gort cows.
What about a castle instead?

Wonderful landscape just keeps changing.
As the road narrows – we are almost there.

Lorenzo burns slowly in the north

3 thoughts on “Belfast to Luogh South”

  1. Have you come across that little Irish man on his tractor yet? No matter what part of the country we were in, he was always slowly chugging along in front of us.

    Loving the photos. Brings back memories of the past.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.